Publications Repository

2002
2002. Ya Ne Dah Ah School | Chickaloon Village. View Report (PDF)Abstract

Official seal of the Chickaloon Village.Dedicated to providing community youth with the skills necessary for functioning in a modern world while maintaining Native knowledge and practices, the Ya Ne Dah Ah School is Alaska’s only tribally owned and operated full-time primary school and day care facility. Located in a two-room schoolhouse and supported entirely by private donations and tribal funding, the School’s twenty students are taught – and excel in – the conventional topics of science, math, English, and social studies. In addition, the students learn Ahtna Athabascan history, language, music, and art – topics and skills that the Village of Chickaloon values and that community members help the School to teach.

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2002. Yakama Nation Land Enterprise | Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation. View Report (PDF)Abstract

Official seal of the Yakama Nation.The Yakama Nation Land Enterprise was created in 1950 to provide the Yakama Nation with an institutional vehicle for confronting its longstanding crisis of land loss. By taking an active role as a buyer and developer of land within the exterior boundaries of the Yakama Reservation, the Yakama Nation Land Enterprise presents an excellent model of how Indian nations can reduce reservation checkerboarding, decrease attendant jurisdictional disputes with other governments, and develop revenue-generating businesses to complete a cycle of self-sufficient land repurchase.

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2002. Yankton Sioux Constitutional Reform Manual | Yankton Sioux Tribe. View Report (PDF)Abstract
2002. Zuni Eagle Sanctuary | Pueblo of Zuni. View Report (PDF)Abstract

Created in 1999, the Zuni Eagle Sanctuary is the first eagle sanctuary owned and operated by Native Americans as well as the first aviary constructed for the purpose of cultural preservation. Combining both functional aspects of eagle care with an aesthetic that reflects the natural surroundings of Zuni, the Sanctuary is home to more than twenty eagles that otherwise would have been destroyed. Successfully meeting the Zunis’ demand for molted eagle feathers that are used in religious and cultural ceremonies, the Sanctuary is also a model of intergovernmental cooperation between a tribal government and federal agency.

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2001
Eric Lemont. 7/2001. “Overcoming the Politics of Reform: The Story of the 1999 Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma Constitutional Convention”. View Report (PDF)Abstract

A pressing international challenge is developing processes of constitution-making that manage the politics of reform and produce legitimate and effective constitutions. This challenge is of special concern for numerous American Indian nations that have been embroiled in dual governments and constitutional crises over the past several decades. This article traces the recent constitutional reform process of the second largest Indian nation in the United States, the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma.

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Blaine Favel and Brenda Stevenson. 5/2001. Native American Women's Business Council. View Report (PDF)Abstract

This report has been prepared at the request of the Native American Women’s Business Council. The Native American Women’s Business Council (NAWBC) operates under the umbrella of the National Indian Business Association. It was created in response to the “need for a forum to voice American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian businesswoman issues”. The organization is in the infancy stages and critical decisions with respect to mandate, functions and how the organization is to be financed have not been determined.

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Katherine Heller and Winthrop Rumi. 5/2001. Job Skills Education Curriculum Supplement for the White Mountain Apache. View Report (PDF)Abstract

This proposal is in response to solicitations from the White Mountain Apache Tribe and the Johns Hopkins Strengthening Families Program.

  • White Mountain currently faces high unemployment and a booming birthrate among teenage parents, a significant cause of growing unemployment in the last two decades.
  • To address these concerns, Johns Hopkins University has created the Strengthening Families Program to teach basic prenatal and infant care to young parents. This proposal responds to the need for additional instruction in finding and maintaining jobs, personal finance, and entrepreneurship.

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Stewart Wakeling, Miriam Jorgensen, and Susan Michaelson. 1/2001. Policing on American Indian Reservations: A Report to the National Institute of Justice.Abstract
Crime is increasing dramatically in Indian Country, but little is known about how such factors as culture, geography, and economy affect law enforcement policies and practices. The superficial description of Indian Country law enforcement shows a rural environment with rural-style policing, but these communities have a "government-to-government" relationship with the United States. While members of different tribes vary widely, most Indian nations face severe social and economic problems. The study was conducted by the Program in Criminal Justice Policy and Management and the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. It began with a literature review and visits to several Indian police departments and the Indian Police Academy in New Mexico. It included a two-part survey distributed to Indian police departments and intensive site visits to four reservations. The study concluded that there is a crisis in reservation policing, including: (1) high turnover and poor employee morale resulting in a lack of well-qualified and experienced officers; (2) flawed basic departmental management; (3) inadequate budgets, fiscal mismanagement, and even corruption; and (4) undue political interference in police operations. Suggested remedies for these problems include increased tribal control over tribal institutions, demotion of Federal agencies from decision makers to advisors and providers of technical assistance, and creation of workable, nation-specific community policing institutions and approaches informed by traditional customs.
Eric Lemont. 2001. “Developing Effective Processes of American Indian Constitutional and Governmental Reform: Lessons from Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, Hualapai Nation, Navajo Nation and Northern Cheyenne Tribe”. View Report (PDF)Abstract

Over the past several decades, numerous American Indian nations have been revising their constitutions to create more legitimate, effective and culturally-appropriate governments. However, successful processes of reform have been hindered by a variety of universal challenges, including political obstacles to changing the status quo, difficulties in achieving effective citizen participation and insufficient mechanisms for resolving conflict. Drawing from the recent constitutional and governmental reform experiences of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, the Hualapai Nation, the Navajo Nation, and the Northern Cheyenne Tribe, this paper discusses how four American Indian nations addressed these challenges.

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Joseph Kalt. 2001. Policy Foundations for the Future of Nation Building in Indian Country. See Full Report (PDF)Abstract
2001. Reframing the Issues: A Path towards Healing for Native American Communities in Massachusetts . View Report (PDF)Abstract
Joseph Kalt and Ken Pepion. 2001. “Statement Before the United States Senate Committee on Indian Affairs’ Hearing Regarding Native American Program Initiatives at the College and University Level”. See Full Report (PDF)Abstract

We thank you for the opportunity to appear here today. We represent the Harvard University Native American Program and its affiliated projects. In addition, Prof. Kalt serves as co-director of the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. We would like to take this opportunity to describe the efforts underway at Harvard as the University reinvigorates its commitment to American Indian issues, students, leaders, and nations. Recent investment in the University’s efforts make this an important and exciting time that holds the promise of bringing Harvard’s considerable resources to bear in a positive way on the challenges of nation building in Indian Country.

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2001. “ Statement Before the United States Senate Committee on Indian Affairs regarding Tribal Good Governance Practices and Economic Development”. See Full Report (PDF)Abstract

Good morning Mr. Chairman, Mr. Vice Chairman and Members of the Committee. Thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss an issue of tremendous importance to Indian Country – effective tribal governance and its impact on economic development and the well being of Native citizenry. My name is Andrew Lee, and I have the pleasure of serving as the Executive Director of the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development (the Harvard Project) at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.1 The Harvard Project is codirected by Prof. Joseph Kalt (Harvard University), Prof. Stephen Cornell (University of Arizona) and Dr. Manley Begay (University of Arizona). 

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2001. Uniting Mescalero Apache Students and Reservation Employment: Mescalero Apache Employment Coordination Program. Publisher's VersionAbstract

This report is designed to recommend a strategy to untie students who have attained post-secondary degrees with on-reservation employment through the creation of a Mescalero Employment Coodination Program.

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Eddie F. Brown, Leslie S. Whitaker, Melinda Springwater, Stephen Cornell, Miriam Jorgensen, Michelle Hale, and Ami Nagle. 2001. Welfare, Work, and American Indians: The Impact of Welfare Reform.Abstract
The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996(PRWORA) ushered in a new era of welfare programs in America. PRWORA and related legislation specifically addressed the needs of American Indian tribes. In this report we review the key features of the welfare reform legislation as it applies to American Indians and Indian Country, assess – to the best of our ability with currently available information – its impact on Indian nations and its chances of achieving its goals, and identify key issues that demand attention if welfare reform is to succeed on Indian lands.
2000
2000. Building the Fort Apache Heritage Foundation: Developing a Strategic Vision, Organizational System, and Management Plan. See Full Report (PDF)Abstract

In 1998, the White Mountain Apache Tribe in Arizona established the Fort Apache Heritage Foundation as a 501©3 corporation. The principal goal of the foundation is to restore and revitalize the world-famous Fort Apache Historic District. 

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2000. Building the Fort Apache Heritage Foundation: Developing a Strategic Vision, Organizational System, and Management Plan. See Full Report (PDF)Abstract

In 1998, the White Mountain Apache Tribe in Arizona established the Fort Apache Heritage Foundation as a 501©3 corporation. The principal goal of the foundation is to restore and revitalize the world-famous Fort Apache Historic District. 

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2000. Jiway Gwavo The War Room: Building a Hualapai Department of Justice . View Report (PDF)Abstract
2000. Local Governance for Oglala Sioux Tribe: A Return to Local Empowerment. See Full Report (PDF)Abstract
2000. The National Evidence on the Socioeconomic Impacts of American Indian Gaming on Non-Indian Communities. See Full Report (PDF)Abstract

"Based on statistical analysis of a national sample of 100 communities across the United States, 24 of which experienced the introduction of a nearby non-Indian casino and 16 of which experienced the introduction of an Indian casino, we find that Indian casinos have substantial beneficial economic and social impact on surrounding communities..."

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