Publications

2004
Jesse Janetta. 5/2004. Mapping the Road- The Yankton Public Safety Commission and Professional Tribal Policing. View Report (PDF)Abstract

The Yankton Sioux Tribe appointed 5 tribal members to sit on the Tribe’s Public Safety Commission in January of 2004. The Commission is intended to exercise oversight of 5 tribal police officers that Yankton is contracting from the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) as provided for under Public Law 93-638. The purpose and powers of the Commission have not yet been established, and this report is intended to assist in developing the Commission so that it plays a productive part in effective law enforcement for the Yankton community.

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Joseph P. Kalt and Joseph William Singer. 3/2004. Myths and Realities of Tribal Sovereignty: The Law and Economics of Indian Self-Rule. View Report (PDF)Abstract

This study explores legal and economic dimensions of current perceptions of (and debates over) the nature and extent of tribal self-rule in the United States, with the objective of distinguishing between myth and reality. The authors address key threads of thought and assumptions that pervade, accurately or inaccurately, discussions in the public policy arena. What emerges is a picture in which tribes do exercise substantial, albeit limited, sovereignty. This sovereignty is not a set of special rights. Rather, its roots lie in the fact that Indian nations predate the United States. While their sovereignty has been diminished, it has not been terminated. Tribal sovereignty is recognized and protected by the U.S. Constitution, legal precedent, and treaties, as well as applicable principles of human rights.

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2004. Building Border Infrastructure- A Study of an Office of International Affairs for the Tohono O'Odham Nation. View Report (PDF)Abstract
2004. A Case Study: Harnessing Resources, Creating Partnerships | Indian Gaming & Diversification by the Tulalip Tribes of Washington. See Full Report (PDF)Abstract

Through the various provisions of the Stevens treaties, the Tulalip Reservation—which was expanded by Executive Order in 1873—is now home to members of the Snohomish, Snoqualmie, Skagit, Suiattle, Samish and Stillaguamish tribes and allied bands.7 The current tribal government at Tulalip is organized under Section 16 of the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934. 8 Today, the Tulalip Reservation covers roughly 23,000 acres, over half of which is held in trust by the federal government on behalf of the Tribes. The Tulalip Reservation possesses considerable natural resources, including marine waters, tidelands, fresh water creeks and lakes, wetlands, forests, and developable land.9 The location of the Reservation—close to a major transportation artery (Interstate 5), a short distance north of Seattle and adjacent to Marysville, Washington—also has proven to be a major benefit, as is now evident in the available market for the Tribes’ gaming and retail enterprises. 

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Stephen Cornell, Catherine Curtis, and Miriam Jorgensen. 2004. “The Concept of Governance and its Implications for First Nations.” Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs, 2004-02. View Report (PDF)Abstract

What do governance and government mean? This paper-one of a series of papers commissioned by the British Columbia Regional Vice-Chief of the Assembly of First Nations-defines governance and government and describes the critical role both play in human communities. It also examines what effective self-governance involves and how self-governing systems can be built, and it draws distinctions between self-administration-sometimes mistaken for self-government and genuine self-government. Drawing on a large body of research on governance and development among indigenous nations in Canada and the United States, the paper considers the implications of these issues for First Nations and for federal governments. The paper concludes with a discussion of the specific tasks facing First Nations and Canada in making Aboriginal self-government a reality.

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2004. The Context and Meaning of Family Strengthening in Indian America. See Full Report (PDF)Abstract

Among professionals and scholars who focus on the wellbeing of children, it is widely recognized that children do not do well unless families do well, and that families do not do well unless communities do well. These straightforward observations have motivated much of recent innovation in family policy and form the explicit or implicit centerpiece of the efforts of leading non-profit actors concerned about child and family well-being. As implemented by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, for example, the interconnectedness of children, families, and communities manifests itself in programs and strategic initiatives clustered under the term “Family Strengthening.”

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2004. A Case Study: Indian Gaming and Community Building | A History of the Intergovernmental Relations of the Mohegan Tribe of Connecticut. See Full Report (PDF)Abstract

The Mohegan Tribe of Uncasville, Connecticut, thrives today because of its highly profitable Mohegan Sun Casino Resort. Upon achieving federal recognition as an American Indian tribe through the Bureau of Acknowledgement and Research of the U.S. Department of the Interior in 1994, the tribe negotiated a tribal-state gaming compact with the State of Connecticut, purchased property with trust funds, and began to work with the neighboring towns on future economic development initiatives. In 1996, the Mohegan Tribe opened its Earth Casino, which had immediate success. In 2002, the Sky Casino was completed; the Mohegans since have welcomed thousands of visitors to the facility on a daily basis. The Mohegans’ achievements are largely attributable to a unique set of historical circumstances, optimal geographic location, and the ability of the Mohegan Council, tribal representatives, and citizens to establish and nurture mutually beneficial relationships with their nonAmerican Indian neighbors. 

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2003
Stephen Cornell, Miriam Jorgensen, Joseph P. Kalt, and Katherine A. Spilde. 10/2003. “Seizing the Future: Why Some Native Nations Do and Others Don't”. View Report (PDF)Abstract

Both research and the experience among Native nations daily drive home the conclusion that the so-called “nation building” approach holds the keys to self-determined social, political, and economic development for indigenous communities. This approach emphasizes the critical role of asserting rights of self-rule and backing up those assertions with governing institutions that are legitimate in the eyes of the people and efficient in their operation. This study examines the question of why is it that some Native nations seize upon the nation building strategy and take effective control of their futures while others do not. We find that foundational change in a community arises when the external and internal conditions a people face interact with their interpretations of their situation, producing a new, shared “story” of what is possible, and how it can be achieved. The keys to changing a community's“story” are found in proactive decisions to alter internal and external situations, acquire concrete knowledge of the feasible, build on the community'scultural assets, and exercise leadership—especially in educating the people in a new vision.

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Kevin Brosseau and Barbara Cook. 5/2003. Ihanktuwan Dakota Oyate Constitutional Reform Process. View Report (PDF)Abstract

The Ihanktuwan Dakotah Oyate Constitution Revision Committee has been entrusted with the task of recommending constitutional amendments which can help ensure the future political stability and economic development of the Tribe. The Ihanktuwan Dakotah Oyate are proud of their culture and traditions and their future economic potential.

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Susie Margolin. 5/2003. “Launching Tribal Telcos-A Decision Analysis Toolkit for Tribes”. View Report (PDF)Abstract

This white paper honors the tenacity with which tribal telcos have served the telecommunication needs of their communities. It recognizes the potential with which telcos can affect change in Indian Country. Indirectly, this paper helps answer the question Why are there only seven tribal telcos? by providing a framework for analysis through which tribes can assess if a telco is an appropriate business venture given their own contexts.

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5/2003. Penobscot Language Rivitalization Program A New Dawn, a New Hope. View Report (PDF)Abstract
Kristin Eifler and Weston Willard. 5/2003. The Vision of Stories as Counseling Tools for Hawaiian Youth Through Ke Kula Kaiapuni. View Report (PDF)Abstract
Emily Van Dyke. 5/2003. Generating Dialogue and Building Partnerships Tailoring the Haplotype Mapping Project to Indian Country. View Report (PDF)Abstract

This report seeks to equip Principal Investigators considering research in Indian Country and any associated researchers, sample collectors, repository technicians, and other associated members of the research team to make clear, comprehensive, and balanced presentations regarding the Haplotype Mapping Project to potential partners in Indian Country. In addition, it seeks to present a culturally aware and constructive framework through which such partnerships might be formed if and when a small-scale Haplotype Mapping Project is undertaken in Indian Country.

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2003. Boys and girls clubs in Indian Country- Building Community Connections . View Report (PDF)Abstract
2003. Social and Economic Consequences of Indian Gaming in Oklahoma. See Full Report (PDF)Abstract

This study of Class II gaming operations in Oklahoma finds that tribal governments are translating revenues and employment opportunities from gaming into positive social investment. The tribes' successes offer a striking example of gaming operations accomplishing their principal intent, namely socioeconomic self-determination for Indian nations.

 

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2003. Social and Economic Consequences of Indian Gaming in Oklahoma. See Full Report (PDF)Abstract

This study of Class II gaming operations in Oklahoma finds that tribal governments are translating revenues and employment opportunities from gaming into positive social investment. The tribes' successes offer a striking example of gaming operations accomplishing their principal intent, namely socioeconomic self-determination for Indian nations.

 

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Miriam Jorgensen and Jonathan Taylor. 2003. What Determines Indian Economic Success: Evidence from Tribal and Individual Indian Enterprises. See Full Report (PDF)Abstract

Prior analysis of American Indian nations' unemployment, poverty, and growth rates indicates that poverty in Indian Country is a problem of institutions- particularly political institutions- not a problem of economics per se. Using unique data on Indian-owned enterprises, this paper sheds light on ont of the core institutions of enterprise success- corporate governance.

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Stephen Cornell and Joseph P. Kalt. 2003. “Alaska Native Self-Government and Service Delivery: What Works?” Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs, 2003-1. View Report (PDF)Abstract

[Excerpt from Executive Summary]

The Native peoples of Alaska have governed themselves for far longer than either the State of Alaska or the United States. Indeed, their rights of self-government are properly defended as basic human rights that are not unilaterally extinguishable by these other governments. Yet, today an assortment of questions are being raised about key aspects of Alaska Native self-governance. Among these are questions such as: What form should Native self-government take? What powers should it include? In which communities or groups should those powers be vested? Additional questions are being raised about how the delivery of social services to Alaska Natives is organized. Who should be responsible for service delivery, and what form should service delivery take?

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2003. Assuring Self Determination through an Effective Law Enforcement Program | Gila River Indian Community. View Report (PDF)Abstract

Recognizing that effective law enforcement is both an essential governmental function and an important expression of sovereignty, the Gila River Indian Community assumed responsibility for its own policing in the late 1990s. Since taking over management from the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), the Gila River Police Department dramatically strengthened its capacity to enforce laws and enhanced public safety improvements that are especially important because of the Community's proximity to a major metropolitan center. With its cadre of highly trained officers, the Gila River Police Department exemplifies the kind of efficiency and responsiveness gains possible under tribal control.

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2003. Cherokee National Youth Choir | Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. View Report (PDF)Abstract

Formed in 2000 as a component of the Nation's comprehensive language program, the Cherokee National Youth Choir performs traditional and contemporary songs in the Cherokee language. Comprised of forty youth between the ages of thirteen and eighteen, the award- winning Choir performs at venues in Cherokee communities and across the country. More importantly, the Choir has proven itself to be an effective tool for inspiring Cherokee youth to learn their language, culture, and history giving real hope that the sacred gifts of language and song will never be lost.

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