Publications Repository

1993
Stephen Cornell. 1993. Accountability, Legitimacy, and the Foundations of Native Self-Governance. See Full Report (PDF)Abstract
Stephen Cornell. 1993. Accountability, Legitimacy, and the Foundations of Native Self-Governance. See Full Report (PDF)Abstract
Joseph Kalt and Stephen Cornell. 1993. Culture as Explanation in Racial and Ethnic Inequality: American Indians, Reservation Poverty, and Collective Action. See Full Report (PDF)Abstract
1993. Developing Restitution as an Alternative Sanction for the Tuba City Family Court | Navajo Nation . View Report (PDF)Abstract
1993. A Foundation for Economic Development for the Hualapai Nation: Building an Enterprise Board | Hualapai Tribal Nation. View Report (PDF)Abstract

"…For the Hualapai Tribe, economic development engenders more than job creation or increased income generation. Economic development is a means of promoting community revitlization, which will empower the Hualapai to move from a dependent state to a sovereign nation. Therefore, the purpose of this pper is to assist in building the institutional development capacity of the Hualapai Nation via the reconstruction of the Enterprise Board..."

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1993. Human Resource Management Reform at the White Mountain Apache Tribe | White Mountain Apache Tribe . View Report (PDF)Abstract
1993. Overcoming Conflicts with the Endangered Species Act: Building Tribal Endangered Species Management Capacity. A Report to the White Mountain Apache Tribe | White Mountain Apache Tribe . View Report (PDF)Abstract
1993. Where Does Economic Development Really Come From? Constitutional Rule Among the Modern Sioux and Apache | Intertribal. View Report (PDF)Abstract

"...How do societies really establish more or less effective and stable institutions of self-government? This conundrum is leading many analysts to explore pre- and extra- constitutional socio-cultural foundations of social organization. This study argues that shared cultural norms of political legitimacy among rational individuals provide such foundations. To test the framwork we examine modern consitutional rule among a set of small nations: the very modern Apache and the Sioux tribes on American Indian reservations..."

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1992
1992. Buying Back the Land: Land Acquisition as a Means to Achieving Tribal Goals on the Puyallup Reservation | Puyallup Tribe . View Report (PDF)Abstract

"…In 1991, the Tribal Council of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians in Tacoma, Washington, identified five long-range goals for the Tribe. The first among these was a stated desire to buy back lands within the Reservtion which had been previously sold by the Tribe or lost through the pssage of the laws and policies of non-Indian governments. For this reson, combined with a requirement by the Land Claims Settlement Act of 1988, the Tribe's Land Use Director is developing a comprehensive land use plan. This report addresses the land acquisition component of the broader land use plan.

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1992. “The Challenges of Leadership and Self-Government: A Perspective From the White Mountain Apaches ”. See Full Report (PDF)Abstract
1992. Negotiating a Vision: Principles of Comprehensive Resource Planning and a Planning Process for the White Mountain Apache Tribe | White Mountain Apache Tribe . View Report (PDF)Abstract
1992. Sociohistorical Factors in American Indian Economic Development: A Comparison of Three Apache Cases. See Full Report (PDF)
Stephen Cornell and Joseph P. Kalt. 1992. What Can Tribes Do?. Order book linkAbstract
In the late 1980s, the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development carried out an extended study of the conditions under which self-determined economic development can be successful on Indian reservations. The core research method was a comparative analysis of development efforts on several reservations. The focus of the collection is on the institutional and developmental strategies most likely to lead to success on tribal terms.
1991
Miriam Jorgensen and Karl Eschbach. 6/1991. “KILI Radio: The Voice of the Lakota Nation, A Report to Oglala Lakota College”. View Report (PDF)Abstract

A Teaching Case Study in Tribal Management for Oglala Lakota College

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1991. Can Tribes Manage Their Own Resources? A Study of American Indian Forestry and the 638 Program. View Report (PDF)Abstract

"…Under the auspices of the federal trust responsibility, the U.S. Federal Government has historically conducted various enterprises, including the maintenance and marketing of Indian timber resources, on behalf of Indian tribes through the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Perhals the trust respinsibility was intended as a sort of quid pro quo for disenfranchising the Indians of untold millions of acres of land during the persuit of America's "manifest destiny". Whatever the reason for this federal interest in Indian affairs, the Federal Government has efectively been serving as the executor of a will, while the decedent is alive and well..."

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1991. Designing Native American Management and Leadership Training: Past Efforts, Present Endeavors, and Future Options. See Full Report (PDF)Abstract
1991. Evaluating Land Use Proposals: A Comprehensive System for the Puyallup Tribe of Indians | Puyallup Tribe. View Report (PDF)Abstract
https://hwpi.harvard.edu/files/hpaied/files/prs91-1.pdf?m=1639579193. 1991. Where's the Glue? Institutional Bases of American Indian Economic Development. View Report (PDF)Abstract

"…In the modern Western World, we think of life and the economy as being ordered by formal law and property rights. Yet formal fules, in even the most developed economy, make up a small (although very important) part of the sum of contraints that shape choices; a moment's reflection should suggest to us the pervasiveness of informal cintraints... - Douglass C. North..."

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1990
1990. Cedar Pass LodgeA Teaching Case Study in Tribal Management for Oglala Lakota College. | . View Report (PDF)Abstract

This case was written by Miriam R. Jorgensen for use at Oglala Lakota College and the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University; it was prepared under the direction of Professors Stephen Cornell and Joseph Kalt, co-directors of the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. Support was provided by the Kellogg Foundation through the Managers as Warriors Program at Oglala Lakota College. THis case was designed to generate class discussion and IS NOT based on actual events. Facts and figures are generally accurate, to allow effective classroom decision-making, but the meeting described herein is entirely fictional.

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