Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma

2005
2005. The Cherokee Language Revitalization Project | Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. View Report (PDF)Abstract

In 2002, the Cherokee Nation carried out a survey of its population and found no fluent Cherokee speakers under the age of 40. The Cherokee Principal Chief declared a state of emergency, and the Nation acted accordingly. With great focus and determination, it launched a multi-faceted initiative designed to revitalize the Cherokee language. Using state- of-the-art knowledge and techniques of language acquisition, the Project includes a language immersion program for pre-school children, a university partnership degree program for certifying Cherokee language teachers, and a set of community language activities. The Project brings together elders, young adults, and children in an effort to preserve not just a language but a people who see in their language the foundation of their own survival.

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2003
2003. Cherokee National Youth Choir | Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. View Report (PDF)Abstract

Formed in 2000 as a component of the Nation's comprehensive language program, the Cherokee National Youth Choir performs traditional and contemporary songs in the Cherokee language. Comprised of forty youth between the ages of thirteen and eighteen, the award- winning Choir performs at venues in Cherokee communities and across the country. More importantly, the Choir has proven itself to be an effective tool for inspiring Cherokee youth to learn their language, culture, and history giving real hope that the sacred gifts of language and song will never be lost.

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2002
2002. Cherokee Nation History Course | Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. View Report (PDF)Abstract

Required as mandatory training for tribal employees, the Cherokee Nation History Course has given employees, both Cherokee and non-Cherokee alike, a stronger sense of pride and a better understanding of self-governance. Indeed, this successful and innovative history and leadership course has stimulated a shift in employees’ and citizens' thinking. Tribal employees see themselves not only as service providers, but as leaders of their nation; tribal members no longer see themselves as mere recipients of services, but as active citizens of a sovereign nation.

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2001
Eric Lemont. 7/2001. “Overcoming the Politics of Reform: The Story of the 1999 Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma Constitutional Convention”. View Report (PDF)Abstract

A pressing international challenge is developing processes of constitution-making that manage the politics of reform and produce legitimate and effective constitutions. This challenge is of special concern for numerous American Indian nations that have been embroiled in dual governments and constitutional crises over the past several decades. This article traces the recent constitutional reform process of the second largest Indian nation in the United States, the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma.

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Eric Lemont. 2001. “Developing Effective Processes of American Indian Constitutional and Governmental Reform: Lessons from Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, Hualapai Nation, Navajo Nation and Northern Cheyenne Tribe”. View Report (PDF)Abstract

Over the past several decades, numerous American Indian nations have been revising their constitutions to create more legitimate, effective and culturally-appropriate governments. However, successful processes of reform have been hindered by a variety of universal challenges, including political obstacles to changing the status quo, difficulties in achieving effective citizen participation and insufficient mechanisms for resolving conflict. Drawing from the recent constitutional and governmental reform experiences of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, the Hualapai Nation, the Navajo Nation, and the Northern Cheyenne Tribe, this paper discusses how four American Indian nations addressed these challenges.

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