Field Reports

2002
2002. From Vision to Decision: Development of the Uplands at Swinomish | Swinomish Indian Tribal Community. See Full Report (PDF)Abstract

The Swinomish Indian Tribal Community’s recent acquisition of a 360-acre parcel of land within the reservation known as the Knudsen Farm marks the beginning of a new period of major opportunities and significant choices for the Swinomish. The Tribe has already decided to devote approximately half of the Knudsen parcel, which lies along the Swinomish Channel below Padilla Bay, to a new 1,200 slip Marina that at the time of this writing is scheduled to begin construction in late summer 2002 (see Map on Page 2 for layout of proposed Marina). The purpose of this report is to investigate the possibilities available to the Swinomish for the development of the remainder of the site, approximately 120- acres surrounding the Marina known as “the Uplands.” The report is written from the perspective that the proposed Marina will move forward as planned, creating an opportunity for the Tribe to choose between a variety of sometimes competing economic and social opportunities created by following different paths in the development of the Uplands. 

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2002. Yankton Sioux Constitutional Reform Manual | Yankton Sioux Tribe. View Report (PDF)Abstract
2001
Blaine Favel and Brenda Stevenson. 5/2001. Native American Women's Business Council. View Report (PDF)Abstract

This report has been prepared at the request of the Native American Women’s Business Council. The Native American Women’s Business Council (NAWBC) operates under the umbrella of the National Indian Business Association. It was created in response to the “need for a forum to voice American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian businesswoman issues”. The organization is in the infancy stages and critical decisions with respect to mandate, functions and how the organization is to be financed have not been determined.

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Katherine Heller and Winthrop Rumi. 5/2001. Job Skills Education Curriculum Supplement for the White Mountain Apache. View Report (PDF)Abstract

This proposal is in response to solicitations from the White Mountain Apache Tribe and the Johns Hopkins Strengthening Families Program.

  • White Mountain currently faces high unemployment and a booming birthrate among teenage parents, a significant cause of growing unemployment in the last two decades.
  • To address these concerns, Johns Hopkins University has created the Strengthening Families Program to teach basic prenatal and infant care to young parents. This proposal responds to the need for additional instruction in finding and maintaining jobs, personal finance, and entrepreneurship.

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2001. Reframing the Issues: A Path towards Healing for Native American Communities in Massachusetts . View Report (PDF)Abstract
2001. Uniting Mescalero Apache Students and Reservation Employment: Mescalero Apache Employment Coordination Program. Publisher's VersionAbstract

This report is designed to recommend a strategy to untie students who have attained post-secondary degrees with on-reservation employment through the creation of a Mescalero Employment Coodination Program.

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2000
2000. Building the Fort Apache Heritage Foundation: Developing a Strategic Vision, Organizational System, and Management Plan. See Full Report (PDF)Abstract

In 1998, the White Mountain Apache Tribe in Arizona established the Fort Apache Heritage Foundation as a 501©3 corporation. The principal goal of the foundation is to restore and revitalize the world-famous Fort Apache Historic District. 

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2000. Building the Fort Apache Heritage Foundation: Developing a Strategic Vision, Organizational System, and Management Plan. See Full Report (PDF)Abstract

In 1998, the White Mountain Apache Tribe in Arizona established the Fort Apache Heritage Foundation as a 501©3 corporation. The principal goal of the foundation is to restore and revitalize the world-famous Fort Apache Historic District. 

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2000. Jiway Gwavo The War Room: Building a Hualapai Department of Justice . View Report (PDF)Abstract
Stanley Sylvan Byers. 2000. Renewing Beauty: Options for Navajo Land Management and Decision Making. View Report (PDF)Abstract
1999
1999. Crow Constitutional Development: Empowering the Crow Nation. . View Report (PDF)Abstract
1999. Crow Tribal Courts in the 21st Century: Changing Paths - Strengthening the Vision. | Crow Tribe of Montana . View Report (PDF)Abstract
1999. Economic, Culture, Identity: The Case of the Aquinnah Cultural Center. | Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head Aquinnah . View Report (PDF)Abstract

The Aquinnah Wampanoag Tribe can transform its vision of the Aquinnah Cultural Center into reality by enhancing the capacity of both the ACC Board of Directors and the Tribal government. Constructing the Aquinnah Cultural Center complex and sustaining the organization in the lon-term requires that both the Tribe and the ACC Board: (1) enhance the management structure of the Center, (2) define the role of the ACC in Tribal economic development, (3) obtin the capital for the initial construction of the complex, and (4) collaborate to the pieces together and make the Center a reality.

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1999. The Oglala Oyate Woitancan Empowerment Zone: A Turning Point in Oglala Lakota Nation Building. | Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation. View Report (PDF)Abstract
1999. Paving the Way: Strategies for Tribes to Increase Transportation Funding. . View Report (PDF)Abstract

This analysis examines the opportunities and limitations of negotiated tax agreements, explores an additional strategy of increaseing tribes' involvement in state and federal transportation planning, and develops actions for tribes acting individually as well as those acting collectively through ITCA, Inc.

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1998
1998. Building Effective Land Management Processes | Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation.Abstract

This report examines the management of lands within the exterior boundaries f the Yakama Indian Nation's Reservation. The key difficulties confronting the Yakama Nation's land managers include: complications caused by checkerboard land ownership, significant amounts of unsued agricultural land, a challenging regulatory enforcement environment, and indifference or hostility from external political actors. While the Yakama Indian Nation and its land use agencies have - in the face of these many difficulties - built a strong foundation for effective land management, significant work remains if the YIN is going to approach complete fulfillment of its goals.

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1998. Building Entrepreneurship and Economic Development for the Bishop Indian Reservation: A Proposal to Achieve Growth Through Unity. Prepared at the Request of the Bishop Paiute Development Corporation. | Bishop Paiute Tribe. View Report (PDF)Abstract

The Bishop Paiute Development Coporation has requested this report, aimed toward improving the quality and success of their Indian Entrepreneurship Program soon to begin under HUD E.D./S.S. funding. While the entrepreneurship program itself is strong, the ervice to entrepreneurs could be maximized by development of greater funding and implementation resources, as well as improved communication and relationships with thr Tribal Council, the surrounding agencies, and the population of the Bishop Indian Reservation.

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1998. Building Support for the Development of the Hualapai Tribal Court. View Report (PDF)Abstract
1998. An Electricity Restructuring Strategy for the Crow Tribe | Crow Tribe of Montana . View Report (PDF)Abstract
1998. Environmental Planning for a Mining Venture on Native Land A Briefing Paper for the Crow Tribe of Montana | Crow Tribe of Montana . View Report (PDF)Abstract

The Crow tribe has recently been approached by Arch Coal Inc. to initiate exploration and mining prospects for a large mining operation within the tribal reserve. Though the tribe has received royalties from other coal mining operations (Absalooka Mine, in particular), this will be the first full-scale mine on Crow land. Hence the tribe needs considerable planning to ensure that the project brings in much-needed funds while also preservin pristine ecosystem that constitutes the Powder River watershed. This report aims to provide background information to facilitate the environmental planning process.

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