Field Reports

2004
Leigh Fitzgerald and Katie Milligan. 5/24/2004. Upper Sioux Language Preservation Program Models, Projects & Plans for Success | Upper Sioux Community. View Report (PDF)Abstract

This report was commissioned by Helen Blue, Upper Sioux Tribal Chairman, to explore ways to sustain existing language programs and expand programming options to increase participation among Upper Sioux tribal members in language preservation efforts. The authors of this report are graduate students at Harvard University enrolled in Nation Building II, part of the Harvard University Native American Project (HUNAP). This report has several objectives:

  • To examine the “state of language acquisition” among the Upper Sioux, including past and present programs;
  • To perform a “feasibility study” of restarting a comprehensive language program, analyzing the tribe’s strengths and weaknesses; &
  • To provide several recommendations and concrete steps for moving forward.

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Wenona Benally and Justin Martin. 5/2004. Navajo Nation Intergovernmental Affairs. View Report (PDF)Abstract
5/2004. Paving the Way for Telemedicine in Indian Country- The Hopi Tribe and Harvard Univ. View Report (PDF)Abstract
Andrew Rabens and Natalie Palugyai. 5/2004. Rosebud Sioux Sicangu Lakota Tetunwan Oyate Constitutional Reform. View Report (PDF)Abstract

The work, which is currently being done within the Rosebud Sioux community to amend the current 1935 IRA Constitution is both timely and extremely commendable. Reforming the constitution so that it better fits the present day lives and culture of the Rosebud Sioux community is an ambitious act, currently being tackled by the Rosebud Community at-large and through the hard work of the Constitutional Task Force. A constitution should serve as the essence of the community, which embodies the spirit, political structure, culture, and way of life in which a society has chosen to live. Potential investors will look at the safeguards in place within the constitution to see how their potential investments will be protected. Foreign peoples will look at the Constitution and develop an image of what the Rosebud Sioux stand for. While a constitution must be legitimate in the eyes of its people, it must also evoke a proud and deep personal sense of connection. There seems to be broad consensus that the current constitution comes up short in these respects. Therefore it is extremely advantageous that the Rosebud Community and the Constitutional Task Force have been working to address some of the current Constitution’s shortcomings. The amending process of the Constitution, which is currently taking place, is a tremendous step in the direction of exerting sovereignty and developing a precious document, which can accurately embody the unique Rosebud culture and establish a culturally practical political structure.

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Leigh Fitzgerald and Katie Milligan. 5/2004. Upper Sioux Language Preservation Program Models, Projects & Plans for Success. View Report (PDF)Abstract
  • This report was commissioned by Helen Blue, Upper Sioux Tribal Chairman, to explore ways to sustain existing language programs and expand programming options to increase participation among Upper Sioux tribal members in language preservation efforts. The authors of this report are graduate students at Harvard University enrolled in Nation Building II, part of the Harvard University Native American Project (HUNAP). This report has several objectives:
  • To examine the “state of language acquisition” among the Upper Sioux, including past and present programs;
  • To perform a “feasibility study” of restarting a comprehensive language program, analyzing the tribe’s strengths and weaknesses; &
  •  To provide several recommendations and concrete steps for moving forward.
Jody Rave and Jesse Hardman. 5/2004. Freedom of the Press in Indian Country. View Report (PDF)Abstract

Freedom of the press is an inalienable right most U.S. citizens take for granted. To ensure
the right to express thoughts and opinions, free press and free speech clauses were
cemented into a legal framework becoming the First Amendment to the U.S. constitution.
Press freedoms have helped the United States become one of the most influential
democracies in world history. The media’s allure lies within its power to provide people
with information so they can be free and self-governing. In journalism, the overriding
obligation is to tell the truth, and to present those truths to citizens.

Equally, they long to hear news from engaging and accurate storytellers. This is a basic
human instinct shared the world over from the most technologically advanced nations to
the isolated and impoverished. Some might question whether a free press is an
appropriate cultural match in Indian Country. Yet nothing overrides people’s need to
know information.

Among the Lakota, storytellers were highly respected individuals within tribal societies.
Those that relayed information to the villages were called eyapahes. It is common even
today to see the thriving nature of storytelling among tribes such as the Crow in Montana.
At traditional community gatherings, it is customary for Crow “camp criers” to typically
ride horse back through the camp in the morning. And in the Crow language he
encourages the camp to wake up and greet the morning sun. He also announces the day’s
upcoming events. Like the Lakota, these are highly respected positions, and one must be
given the ceremonial rite to fulfill the camp crier role.

Today the dilemma in Indian Country is that news dissemination has changed. Tribal
news sources often exist not for the people, but as propaganda tools of the tribal council.
For more than a decade, the Native American Journalists Association (NAJA) has been
and advocate for securing press freedoms at tribal newspapers. NAJA dedicated 1998, as
the “The Year of Promoting Free Expression in Native America.” It was an effort to bring
greater awareness to press censorship where tribal leaders can hire and fire reporters at
will, where tribal journalists typically don’t have access to tribal government documents,
where tribal councils often review news before it’s published.

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Jesse Janetta. 5/2004. Mapping the Road- The Yankton Public Safety Commission and Professional Tribal Policing. View Report (PDF)Abstract

The Yankton Sioux Tribe appointed 5 tribal members to sit on the Tribe’s Public Safety Commission in January of 2004. The Commission is intended to exercise oversight of 5 tribal police officers that Yankton is contracting from the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) as provided for under Public Law 93-638. The purpose and powers of the Commission have not yet been established, and this report is intended to assist in developing the Commission so that it plays a productive part in effective law enforcement for the Yankton community.

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2004. Building Border Infrastructure- A Study of an Office of International Affairs for the Tohono O'Odham Nation. View Report (PDF)Abstract
2003
Kevin Brosseau and Barbara Cook. 5/2003. Ihanktuwan Dakota Oyate Constitutional Reform Process. View Report (PDF)Abstract

The Ihanktuwan Dakotah Oyate Constitution Revision Committee has been entrusted with the task of recommending constitutional amendments which can help ensure the future political stability and economic development of the Tribe. The Ihanktuwan Dakotah Oyate are proud of their culture and traditions and their future economic potential.

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Susie Margolin. 5/2003. “Launching Tribal Telcos-A Decision Analysis Toolkit for Tribes”. View Report (PDF)Abstract

This white paper honors the tenacity with which tribal telcos have served the telecommunication needs of their communities. It recognizes the potential with which telcos can affect change in Indian Country. Indirectly, this paper helps answer the question Why are there only seven tribal telcos? by providing a framework for analysis through which tribes can assess if a telco is an appropriate business venture given their own contexts.

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5/2003. Penobscot Language Rivitalization Program A New Dawn, a New Hope. View Report (PDF)Abstract
Kristin Eifler and Weston Willard. 5/2003. The Vision of Stories as Counseling Tools for Hawaiian Youth Through Ke Kula Kaiapuni. View Report (PDF)Abstract
Emily Van Dyke. 5/2003. Generating Dialogue and Building Partnerships Tailoring the Haplotype Mapping Project to Indian Country. View Report (PDF)Abstract

This report seeks to equip Principal Investigators considering research in Indian Country and any associated researchers, sample collectors, repository technicians, and other associated members of the research team to make clear, comprehensive, and balanced presentations regarding the Haplotype Mapping Project to potential partners in Indian Country. In addition, it seeks to present a culturally aware and constructive framework through which such partnerships might be formed if and when a small-scale Haplotype Mapping Project is undertaken in Indian Country.

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2003. Boys and girls clubs in Indian Country- Building Community Connections . View Report (PDF)Abstract
2003. Creating a Community Development Corporation | Brothertown Indians of Wisconsin. See Full Report (PDF)Abstract
2002
Bruce Stonefish and Amy Besaw-Medford. 5/2002. Muhheconneq National Confederacy. View Report (PDF)Abstract

This report was created to assist the Penobscot Nation in their efforts to reunify the historic Muhheconnew National Confederacy. This document was intended to aid the promotion, understanding, and awareness of the historical origins and accounts of this northeastern coastal confederacy. In addition to providing a historical overview, this document presents contemporary activities and status of the confederacy since its restoration on February 29th, 1992.

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Kendra Shumway and Emily Hansen. 5/2002. Planting Seeds for the Future- Nation Building for Native Youth. View Report (PDF)Abstract
2002. Corporate Executives Roles and Responsibilities . View Report (PDF)Abstract
2002. Wakanyeia Pawicayapi, Inc. and the Case for Direct Billing | Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation.Abstract
2002. White Mountain Apache Tribe Taking Enterprises into the 21 st Century: Rethinking Sunrise Ski Resort | White Mountain Apache Tribe . View Report (PDF)Abstract

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